How to fire a horrible Client

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How to fire a horrible Client

Do you know the difference between a terrible client and a challenging client? 

Take a look at this article and get some advise on how to get rid of those terrible clients (we all have them!).

How to Fire a Horrible Client - SMALL BIZ AHEAD

When you first started your small business, you were probably overjoyed when you landed your first customer. You were grateful for the work, and their belief in you validated the reason you became your own boss. Then you got your first bad client - you know, the one that makes you cringe when they call.

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The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry

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The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry

The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry

A full moon.  A perfectly calm blue-sky and the sun about to rise.  I had been planning on my first fishing trip of the season for two weeks and was really looking forward to it.  I had new gear and a new tech toy to find all the fish in the lake charged up and ready to go.  I got out on the lake about 4:50 am and paddled through the calm still waters out to the center of the cove like I always do to get my gear setup and ready to fish. While I was getting set up, I heard splashes all around me as the lake was alive with turtles, fish, ducks, and geese.  Picture perfect.  I put on my new lure and did a trial cast with my new spinning reel and all systems were a go.  But then my phone chirped.  Then again.  Then again.  I was forced to dig it out and see what was up.  My assistant who was going to open for me this morning had a difficult night and was ill.  She couldn’t open up the office for me this morning. 

I sat back in my kayak and a flurry of thoughts ran through my head.  First was panic that I wouldn’t have enough time to get home, shower and to the office to open in time.  Then I remembered it was only 5:00 am.  Then I quickly tried to figure out what other plans I had in place to cover for me in cases like this but in the end, none were going to work.  Then a not so funny memory popped into my head of a young individual asking how great it was to own my own business.  With the thought so prevalent in my head at that moment – owning your own business means everything falls on you if all else fails.  Regardless of your plans - there is nobody else to handle the situation but you.  So I packed up my gear and paddled back to shore.  Popped the kayak on top of the car and headed home to get ready for the day. 

As if someone was watching my life, I got an email this morning about “How to Keep Your Small Biz Running Without You in 5 Steps”.  A bit of clairvoyance on their part to send that to me this morning – so I thought I would share it with you. 

There are good points in the article but I struggle with having all of the details ironed out as they suggest.  My day as an operator of a coworking space consists of scheduling meeting rooms on the fly with my customers, giving tours as folks just pop in and are interested in the space, and dealing with a variety of “situations” as the many personalities of a coworking space collide each day.  That’s pretty hard to write down in a contingency plan!  But please take a look at the article as there are good thought and ideas outlined. 

 

How to Keep Your Small Biz Running Without You in 5 Steps - SMALL BIZ AHEAD

If you're a hands-on small business owner, it's crucial to plan for a day when a crisis - a sudden illness, family emergency, or travel disaster - keeps you away from the office. Smart business owners get business insurance to help protect against common risks like natural disasters and theft, but then some fail to ...

 

 

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Being profitable means you are paying yourself

If you run a small business and are covering your bills and employees expenses every month - you feel as though your doing OK.  But if you are not paying yourself a reasonable salary, you're not profitable and you're not doing ok. 

If you pay yourself first and then cover your bills, this forces you to figure out a way to make it work.  There is no false sense of comfort when you do this and if you can't make it work, you probably need a "Plan B".  Even if you are only paying yourself a small percentage of your revenue each month, you're still getting paid.  Increase that percentage every month - again forcing yourself to grow your business.   But pay yourself first - then deal with bills.

This article below offers a good perspective on this topic.  Take a look.

How To Figure Out How Much to Pay Yourself

You are in college and it is the summer. You decide to paint houses to make a little pocket money. A neighbor of yours is interested. You look at his house and then figure out the cost of the paint will be $500. Would you charge him $500 to paint the house?

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When Working From Home Doesn’t Work

This is a great article on the power and value of working together.  I see this happening in our space here.  Members bouncing ideas and thoughts off other members.  You can't replace the experience and value of human interaction with technology.  As much of a technology geek that I am, I have to agree there is nothing technically available to replace a door jam conversation.  (for the younger generation - the mere expression "Door Jam" comes from a time when we all worked in the same building and many problems were solved hanging out in someone's doorway)

"The power of presence has no simple explanation. It might be a manifestation of the “mere-exposure effect”: We tend to gravitate toward what’s familiar; we like people whose faces we see, even just in passing. Or maybe it’s the specific geometry of such encounters. The cost of getting someone’s attention at the coffee machine is low—you know they’re available because they’re getting coffee—and if mid-conversation, you see that the other person has no idea what you’re talking about, you automatically adjust."

 

When Working From Home Doesn't Work

The reaction was generally unsparing. The announcement was depicted, variously, as the desperate move of a company whose revenues had fallen 20 quarters in a row; a veiled method of shedding workers; or an attempt to imitate companies, like Apple and Google, that never embraced remote work in the first place.

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Bring on the corporate world! Are you ready?

I have seen this trend in our coworking space.  It makes perfect sense that corporations would utilize the infrastructure created by coworking spaces.  It's inexpensive, flexible, and a smaller commitment than traditional leases.  

 

Corporate Coworking and Preparing Your Flexible Workspace - essensys

In light of the significant changes we've seen in the flexible workspace market we thought it appropriate to take a look at Corporate Coworking. From its origins to the driving forces behind the move to a coworking environment, keep reading to understand why you need to factor in corporates to your shared workspace or Coworking business plan.

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The Only R Word More Important Than Revenue

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The Only R Word More Important Than Revenue

It supersedes every other marketing tool out there when it comes to ROI and cost efficiency. It can also have a huge domino effect on driving new customers to your business.

It's called Referral marketing.

The Only R Word More Important Than Revenue

Any ideas? Here's a hint... It supersedes every other marketing tool out there when it comes to ROI and cost efficiency. It can also have a huge domino effect on driving new customers to your business. It's called R eferral marketing. Why is it so influential? It boils down to trust.

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